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Share the love with Leslie Cochran, Austin’s Icon of Weird

Leslie Cochran passed Thursday, March 8, 2012 at 1:00 am…March 8th happened to be International Women’s Day, a full moon and later that day, was declared “Leslie Day” by City of Austin Mayor Lee Leffingwell.

See the “Love for Leslie” Facebook page for news coverage on Leslie’s illness, demise and services/tributes in his honor.

Share your Leslie stories here.

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78 comments on “Share the love with Leslie Cochran, Austin’s Icon of Weird

  1. loveforleslie
    March 4, 2012

    On Leslie’s year-long journey to Austin back in the mid 90′s on his tricycle (“trike“), he had passed through many an unsuspecting town. After awhile, or really, after crossing the TX border, as you might imagine, where a Leslie-sighting would become the talk of a town for weeks following, law enforcement in one county began to call up the next jurisdiction he was heading to in order to ‘warn’ them.

    With 3 Christian universities and a heavily church-dominated culture, Abilene, TX is known as one of the most conservative places on earth – outside Saudi Arabia, perhaps. It is the buckle of the bible belt.

    After arriving in Austin and meeting new folks, some asked about his journey, wondering how he was received, especially in places like Abilene. In his usual sly demeanor, Leslie replied: “Abilene? Oh they are so friendly there! … I couldn’t believe it. They met me at the town’s edge with a motorcade and escorted me all the way to the other side!”

    Thanks, Abilene :-)

  2. ellaregee
    March 4, 2012

    thanks for sharing. i hope to see more fun stories like this on this site

    • loveforleslie
      March 4, 2012

      I just got this site up today. It won’t be long before it’s flooded with stories :-)

  3. tericamp
    March 5, 2012

    Although Leslie has told me many “off colour” jokes over the years, for some reason this one sticks in my mind:

    One day, I was at the Walgreen’s on S. Lamar, and Leslie was in line in front of me. (He had talked the gentleman in front of him into paying for his purchase, lol) He turned to me and said “Hey….what’s worse than ants in your pants?” I said “I don’t know, Leslie…tell me what’s worse than ants in your pants…” His reply: “Uncles in your pants!” We cracked up laughing, we hugged, and off he went….

  4. tericamp
    March 5, 2012

    One story I will never forget… A few years ago, my husband, Mark, and I were hanging at Barton Springs and run into Leslie. We have some conversation, and smoke, and hang out for a while. I had on my awesome turquoise/black striped bathing suit. We said our good-byes, and turned and walked away. We got about 15-20 feet downstream, and Leslie yells “Hey!” We turn back, like “What??”, and he looks me up and down, and says “by the way….the bikini WORKS!” And I’m thinking, from Leslie…that is a HUGE compliment…lol.

  5. jojo
    March 5, 2012

    I swear I saw the Mayor the first day he rolled into town. I was driving a UT shuttle bus and I saw this cardboard monstrosity on a wagon on Camino La Costa heading west. As I passed I couldn’t see who was pulling it and only a fantastic set of legs atop high heels showed underneath. I didn’t have any passengers, and being the horndog I am I went off route and circled back around to have another, better look. After I witnessed the upper half was a dude with a beard with some tank top titties, I had the “just when you saw everything” moment for the day that keeps one smiling in Austin and reminds us that this is home.
    “You can’t kill me. I will not die. Not now, not ever, not never! I’m gonna live a long, long time. My soul lives on forever!”

  6. Bob B.
    March 5, 2012

    Last night a friend told me a story I had not heard, that several years ago Leslie very quietly raised about $2,000 to donate in support of the downtown homeless shelter programs. LC never bragged about it or as far as I know ever mentioned it.

    And up until the day he collapsed, he was tracking down people to pay them back money he had borrowed, or just to make up for money he had been given in the past. When I think of Leslie, the lyric of Bob Dylan rings in my head – “to live outside the law, you must be honest.”

    Oh, where are you tonight, sweet LC?

  7. audrey holmes
    March 5, 2012

    Seeing you Leslie on 6th street, when I worked down there serving drinks to assholes that all looked the same and made me feel I was doing something wrong, reminded me that true beauty is being myself and not giving a shit what anyone else thought.

    Thank You for being you!! May the Force be with You on this Journey

  8. Sister Marvalicious
    March 5, 2012

    I just want to say thanks Leslie, for being that neighbor that I can count on always being friendly and real and funny, even when I was down, or you were down (which didn’t seem to be often.) I don’t see you much since I don’t work downtown or live south anymore but I care very much about how you are doing. I wish for your improved health and happiness and send you lots of big warm hugs. Thanks for keeping Austin real and weird, in that order! Lotsa love!

  9. Casey.
    March 5, 2012

    When I moved to Austin for college in 1997, I was leaving home for the first time after having lived a very sheltered first 18 years. The first day of UT orientation, I went down to the Drag and saw Leslie hanging out outside the Eckerd. And I knew I was home.

    I live in NYC now, and a friend of mine brought me the Leslie magnets a few years ago. Seeing him on my refrigerator reminds me of home.

    Best wishes to you for rest and peace.

  10. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Very impressed by this article…going into the symbolism of the situation: http://www.tmdailypost.com/article/media/austin-icon-leslie-hospice-care

  11. Megan
    March 5, 2012

    Leslie’s personality has reminded me of my father in a lot of ways. He is one of the most moving people I have ever met. Growing up, we’d see him here and there. I went to elementary/middle school downtown, and Leslie sightings were frequent. It wasn’t until I was in high school where I listened to the things he would say & especially his message during his mayorial run here in Austin.

    I always told my friends that any time I was having a bad day or if my morning got off on the wrong foot, as long as I saw Leslie it would make everything better. I remember when my father passed away, I saw Leslie on Congress Ave the next day after a long morning of funeral planning. Now, I don’t know what would’ve been a better sign than that.

    My days would be better when I’d see him. It didn’t matter if I was driving down Lamar or shopping in the stores on S. 1st. We chatted briefly from time to time and I could really see his beautiful heart at times. He would entertain children for the love of it, tell jokes, give treats to animals… Seeing all these things just better affirmed my belief that any day with Leslie was going to be a great day.

    The last time I saw him was back in late September ’11. We saw him and invited him to join us at our table for a friend’s birthday party down at Polvo’s. He cracked some excellent jokes, he joined in on our conversation, and it just seemed like he was meant to be there. We shared our food, friends shared cigarettes, we got a picture or two with the birthday girl & we gave him a token of appreciation. He was there when we left and I gave him a hug and told him to take care of himself.

    I know there will be good days and bad days, happy days and sad days ahead. I already miss seeing him by suprise and making my day. I know I am not the only one who feels this way. I will be thinking of him every day, even if I do not see him, because his heart has left a permanent engaving on my own.

  12. Lili and Darren Moon
    March 5, 2012

    My husband and I have worked in the downtown Austin restaurant scene for some time, and would have “Leslie sightings” on a regular basis–usually as he roamed into one of our favorite after work spots: Buffalo Billiards.

    One night, as we were driving to our South Austin apartment, we encountered him in the parking lot of Pinky’s, just off South Congress. His “home” had been confiscated by the police, and had nowhere to stay. We offered him to stay at our place for a night or two, just to make sure he could figure out what to do next–and we enjoyed his company, along with his wicked sense of humor that evening. The next morning, we went to go get some breakfast tacos to share with him, and came back to Leslie happily sweeping our place and doing a little housework. It was a really funny, endearing sight–but as Leslie put it: he always repays for the hospitality and friendship in any way he can…

    That is one guy with lots of class. Leslie–sending you love and light all the way from Alaska.

  13. Spiritual Chef
    March 5, 2012

    Leslie is like a glue that binds us all! How many people Leslie has touched! I have a Leslie story too, like most everyone here, I used to go hang out with him at Bouldin Creek Coffee house because he was soothing, he was loving to everyone equally, and he was a breath of fresh air! He had such a loving “power” about him, he seemed to give equal attention to everyone. I think his influence comes from just being himself. He simply is Leslie as Leslie is, and his authentic way has inspired much love and laughter, it has touched hundreds of people and given us all common ground to stand on. We love you Leslie! Viviane Vives

  14. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Wonderful short clip on Leslie…”Austin’s Queen of Political Soul”… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMvtF3Q8Bwc

  15. Deborah Dopp
    March 5, 2012

    I love Leslie, though we have never actually met. I fell like I know Leslie through the paintings (beautiful) and stories (really lovely) of others. Sending Love to Leslie that carries him wherever he wants to go. Freely. Deborah Dopp

  16. Deborah Dopp
    March 5, 2012

    I guess the above typo is my Freudian slip, that I fell in love with all that Leslie is. This is the Love that is all.

  17. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    I’m lifting stories from the Love For Leslie! Facebook page as some haven’t made their way here yet…here’s the first:

    Leah Lisenbee
    I managed a ladies dress shop on 8th and Congress before it closed. Every morning, I would walk to the bank and then walk to Starbucks…if he was on the corner at 6th and Congress, I would always offer to buy Leslie coffee, and he would always turn me down…one really cold morning however, he took me up on it, and made a special drink request. THAT is the day that Leslie created my addiction to Caramel Macchiatos. After that whenever we saw each other he would call me his “Coffee Queen”…it didn’t matter if it had been days, months or even a yr or more…he always remembered. ♥

  18. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Rhonda Blalock
    Hi…I am writing this for my mother Linda Blalock. Mom and Leslie are cousins and grew up together. Unfortunately, I have never had the pleasure of meeting Albert. He sound like a very fun guy! Mom and I were reading everyone’s posts and Mom said that he has always been the way everyone is describing him today. He was always loving and kind and was always there to help out when needed. He made us laugh:) We grew up, moved on to live our own lives and, sadly, lost touch. Thank you, everyone, for giving him a special place in your hearts as he holds in mine. Praying for peace for “Leslie”:) Someone give him a hug and tell him Linda loves him!!!!

  19. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Susan Smith
    Get well soon Leslie! You are loved! I had the pleasure of meeting you 11 years ago. You had me rolling but you could tell something was wrong. When I told you my husband just passed away you told me he would always watch over me. And that I wouldn’t ever find another man like him. Well he has been gone 12 years and you were right I’m still his widow to this very day! Prayers are all around you! Now fight! Love your friend Susan!

  20. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Mary Ann Castro
    I’ve seen Leslie many times, at Eeyores, at Texas Chili Parlour, just around town. I got the privilege of taking this photo with him during 2008 Santacon. I voted for him when he ran for Mayor. I will miss you Leslie! I hope you are not feeling any pain. And know that you are in our thoughts.

    http://www.facebook.com/debmocracy#!/photo.php?fbid=10150715072518343&set=o.156982916635&type=1&theater

  21. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Jill Edwards
    So sad to read about Leslie’s situation. I heard about him for years until one day at 6th and Congress, where he was camped for the day, I got to meet him. He was very gracious! During his campaign for mayor, I found him at Lamar and Koenig, handing out brochures to those in the left turn lane – in his best French outfit, complete with fishnet hose and unabashed about the wind exposing his buttcheeks. Lots of people were honking and he flashed that famous smile! And he was such a gentleman on election night – really blew a lot of people away. I’m no longer in Austin or I’d be there for him in person. God Bless you, Leslie … you are the heart of Austin!

  22. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Brandon Boggs
    Dear Leslie,

    I miss seeing that thong wearing little butt of yours. Always perks up the day! Hang in there homie. Even if you still want to go to Colorado, that is all good, just get well soon so we can send you in style um k?

  23. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Monika Hakkinen
    sending love, support, and well-wishes from my new home in australia.
    hang in there, leslie, and know that you’re loved, locally and worldwide! ♥

  24. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Tara Pettit
    leslie was AWESOME with my kids when we saw him out this night! he gave my daughter reading advice and just chatted with her! we will miss seeing him and chatting with him every time!

    http://www.facebook.com/debmocracy#!/photo.php?fbid=10150822732862646&set=o.156982916635&type=1&theater

  25. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Harold Cook
    …I adore Leslie and am hoping for the very best for him. I wrote this about him a while back when he had his previous troubles….

    http://www.lettersfromtexas.com/2009/10/it-was-almost-like-thong-but-it-was.html

  26. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Anna Ellis
    Leslie, I just want you to know how loved you are! You are what Austin is all about! One Love ♥

  27. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Allison Ply
    Leslie, I want to thank you for helping me wish my friends and family a Happy Valentine’s Day this year. I added a little “bling” to your outfit and let you hold my heart in your hand. Open minds and open hearts are what make Austin so weird and wonderful. Thanks again for being a part of my world. Sending you light, love, and laughter.

    http://www.facebook.com/debmocracy#!/photo.php?fbid=403414179674897&set=o.156982916635&type=1&theater

    …His image is from one of the magnet sets. He is on the inside of my door and gets to say goodbye to visitors as they leave my home. He always leaves them smiling.

  28. loveforleslie
    March 5, 2012

    Mardi VanEgdom
    I’ve met you a few times at Valerie’s and been to one of your birthday parties. I think you are one of the truest individualists of our time, Leslie. An individualist myself, I rather admire you. I’m sorry you’ve had such a bad year with your health and all. I’ve wanted to really meet you and get to talk. I’ll be praying for you. Austin will never be the same without you.

  29. Lee F
    March 5, 2012

    I remember the first time I saw Leslie back during the early 90′s, when I was a student in Georgetown. We’d go to Austin all the time, and see him down on Lamar, and the first time I saw him, butt hanging out of a super bright bikini, he took me by surprise because I thought, “whoa, that’s a dude in a bikini!” After seeing him on several different occasions, it became nothing unusual to see him out and about, and he was part of the Austin landscape.

    A couple of years later, when I graduated and my family came down from the Dallas area, we were heading to dinner at Threadgill’s to celebrate, and we saw Leslie. I was driving my brother, sister and cousins with me, and they saw him standing in the intersection and freaked out. They said, “omigod, who is THAT?” I laughed and said, “That’s Leslie. He lives around here and is a good guy, no worries.”

    I hope he is able to recover…Austin will not be the same without him!

    • mary shawley
      March 5, 2012

      Back around the 90′s when Leslie was around Lamar & Broker, my parents & sister were visiting from Houston. We’d had lunch at a popular mexican restaurant. My sister managed to get a Margaret out. We say Leslie. Everyone wanted to meet him. We stopped to say hi etc. My sister gave him her margarita. That was a great experience!

  30. Melissa Myer
    March 6, 2012

    I remember when Leslie first came to Austin, so there are quite a number of stories that I could share about hanging out eating burgers on 6th Street or the night he crashed at my then-significant other’s place, on the couch. But what lingers in my mind is the last time I saw him in person. I was hosting a baby shower for a friend at the Driskill Hotel. We were seated outside the 1886 Cafe in the lobby, and Leslie walked by. All of the ladies — including the very pregnant mom-to-be — ran out the door, yelling, “Leslie! Leslie!” We all had our pictures taken with him, us in our girlie Sunday frocks and Leslie in his outrageous get-up. He invited us to his birthday party (he was handing out invitations), and I now wish that I’d gone. But I was too busy. Mea culpa, Leslie — and a very belated “Happy Birthday!”

  31. anonymous
    March 6, 2012

    I came to Austin in 1997, and I used to run into him all over town. My most vivid memories are 1) waxing politics with him at Campbells Hole after one of the mayoral elections; 2) warning him that the cashier at the 7-11 on MLK was calling the cops because his thong was freaking her out; and 3) more recently chatting with him on the southbound #1 bus – we were both on our way back to our ’04 hood. I’m glad to hear he’s comfortable and in good hands – though I don’t know him that well, I can safely say he deserves nothing less. He’s smart, sassy, strange, and perfectly “Austin”.

  32. Jason Sugg
    March 6, 2012

    When my first daughter was quite young I would take her every morning down to our local coffee shop while her Mom got a little extra snooze. Leslie would often be there, doing his thing. He would always engage with my daughter, getting her attention with a startling array of crazily accurate barnyard animal noises. I like to think of those encounters as early lessons for my daughter in being your authentic self, as well as the joy that some healthy stepping out of bounds can bring.

  33. M.W.
    March 6, 2012

    I ran into Leslie once at Room 710 on Red River. He’d found a cell phone on the street and wanted to figure out how to find the owner and let them know where it was. I showed him how to turn it on and we found a number for HOME. He dialed and left a message on the answering machine that picked up. He left the phone behind the bar and the took off into the night. He’s an Austin Icon, an angel of the downtown area. I hope he finds peace somewhere.

  34. D.
    March 6, 2012

    Over the years of being a Metro Bus Driver I had may conversations with Leslie. He was always kind and I discovered that he was very intelligent.

  35. brett h
    March 6, 2012

    I have never met someone as beautifully unique as Leslie. One of my favorite Leslie memories is when I was out to dinner with friends at Iron Cactus on 6th. We were seated by the window at the front of the restaurant, sipping margaritas, when Leslie strutted our way. He twirled his boa and did a few bend-and-snap moves for us before sashaying on to the next thing. Leslie has a way of brightening every moment and sparking smiles and laughter. He shows such genuine kindness to all he encounters, never refusing a greeting. I am so thankful that he is in good hands.

    Sending Leslie love from Washington, DC!

  36. Kelly
    March 6, 2012

    I think just about every person who has lived in Austin has a picture taken with Leslie, on 6th street…I know I do! One night, he told me that he liked my coat…which I took as a huge compliment. It hasn’t been the same without Leslie downtown the past few years, and he will be greatly missed and never, ever, replaced.

  37. Tish Meeks
    March 6, 2012

    I first met Leslie in 2004 when I was just getting my little band off the ground. We’d met a crew of kids fresh out of film school who wanted to shoot a video for us for their portfolio. As we began writing the story board, the leader of the crew decided Leslie would be perfect to feature as the main character. One of my bandmates balked, worried that Leslie wouldn’t be reliable. We finally talked him into it, and guess who was the only person who made it on time for the video shoot? Yep, Leslie was the first one there, ready to go. The band was late, the film crew was late, yet there was Leslie! All he wanted as payment was to get to keep his outfit for the shoot…and of course, the outfit had his name all over it. Who else could even pull it off besides him? It was a great experience and we were friends from that day forward. I will never forget that day of filming with him and I’m so glad I have the video to remember him by, always. What a great guy…I feel blessed having known him. Much love from me and the rest of 3 Kisses. Peace to you, my friend.

  38. Flatfork709
    March 6, 2012

    ok, So about 10 years ago, were down at Twin Falls with my 5 year old daughter and We see a man in a speedo bending over in the water. I make some maybe off color comment about the man over thee bending over in a speedo, why do guys wear them or something like that……..my daughter looks over and mind you, all she could see was his freckled buttcheeks pointing towards us……she says oh, Look! there is Leslie! My kids love leslie, and the fact that they are totally fine with his freckled butcheeks anywhere int he city just cracks me up!

  39. loveforleslie
    March 6, 2012

    Patricia Jacobs
    I just found out about your situation, Leslie. The last few times I saw you, you weren’t the same Leslie…..you didn’t look happy/well…I didn’t know. I know now and I wish you a peaceful transition surrounded by your family and close friends. So many people love and respect you. You will be missed. You are in my prayers and you will not be forgotten. ♥

  40. loveforleslie
    March 6, 2012

    Megan Dunegan
    love you leslie!! you’re in my prayers!!!!

  41. loveforleslie
    March 6, 2012

    Elaine Evans-Lombe
    The first time I came to Austin I was driven around by my aunt and uncle and we went down South Congress and saw Leslie walking down the street in his bumblebee outfit and before I could say anything my aunt told me that I’ll have good luck in Austin because I was lucky enough to see Leslie on the first try. I’ve been keeping it weird now since 2004 and all my prayers, luck and good vibes are going to Leslie!

  42. loveforleslie
    March 6, 2012

    Amy Wright-Long
    Dear Friend Leslie! There’s no better time to leave than when you are surrounded with love from your family and extended family of friends and admirers. Start your next adventure knowing in your heart of hearts that WE will continue to hold the fort and continue the quality of weirdness that you so upheld in your mortal form! ♥

  43. loveforleslie
    March 6, 2012

    Alan Melore-Gallery
    I have lived various times in Austin and always used to see Leslie @ 6th & Congress and he put a smile on my face (not in a bad way) because he resembles to me what Austin is all about. Wish I had stopped and talked so Im keeping him in my prayers that I WILL c him again downtown. Much love, Leslie….

  44. loveforleslie
    March 6, 2012

    Christopher McCorkle
    I picked Leslie up 3 times, and took him to San Marcos, between the 97-99 time frame, to be a special guest on my radio show.. KIND103.9FM Welcome To Insanity. I will miss finding him and taking the time to have dinner at Katz’s and talk with him for hours.. truly an interesting individual who was a true human and personally humbling at all levels of spirituality.

  45. loveforleslie
    March 6, 2012

    Michael Hilburn
    A few years ago I went through a divorce, I can honestly say that without Leslie’s humor I may have given up on life. I may have bought the beer but he deserved so much more…

  46. James Retherford
    March 6, 2012

    My own eye-popping Leslie moment was so extraordinary that to this day I wonder whether I actually saw it or was having an acid flashback.

    I used to work at the University of Texas and every day changed buses en route home at Sixth and Congress. This was maybe a decade or so ago during the time of Leslie’s downtown protest “occupation” against the APD when he parked daily outside Starbuck’s, his shopping cart covered with messages about police misconduct written with Sharpie on cardboard. Apparently some of the cops didn’t find fishnet, sequins, and boas as stylish as the rest of us did.

    One day I was running a little late. When I got off the bus, Leslie wasn’t at the corner. But as I looked west on Sixth Street, I saw an apocryphal vision:

    Leslie was sitting in his fullest glory on top of his shopping cart. Surrounding him and powering his “chariot” in march step were four very large verrrrrry muscular African American men dressed in shiny gold tunics. At that point my jaw hit the ground.

    Alas I had no camera to prove to you –or to myself — that I had witnessed a truly transcendent moment of dada, courtesy of the future mayor of Austin.

    Onward through the fog, my friend. Peace be with you.

  47. Gloria
    March 6, 2012

    About two years ago I was visiting my daughter in Austin. As I walked my new grandson down Newton I saw Leslie walking toward us. He asked where we were going and when I told him Bouldin Creek for coffee he turned around and escorted us all the way there. He was very kind and walked between the traffic and the baby warning me about traffic. What a kind and interesting guy! Thanks Leslie for being you! Prayers sent from Ohio.

  48. Denise G
    March 7, 2012

    I moved to Austin in 1998, a year out of college. My parents helped me move and were nervous about leaving me in a new state, far away from home. The morning before they left, we went out to breakfast downtown. As we drove up Congress Ave near 6th St, something hot pink caught our eye on the street corner. It was Leslie in BRIGHT neon pink high heels and a very short cheerleader uniform. My dad immediately cracked up – he learned on his first trip down that Austin is quirky and fun, and it lightened the mood for my parents. After I saw Leslie more I was able to call home and tell my dad all about who this fella in the cheerleading uniform was, and my dad has always been his biggest fan. Get well soon Leslie – we love you!

  49. LD
    March 7, 2012

    Leslie was always friendly any time that I ran into him around Austin. I loved watching him work the crowd at 6th and Congress with the preaching guitar man years ago. Easy way to tell locals from visitors was by their reactions. Takes real guts to put yourself out there day after day, and he trekked on out there relentlessly.

    Another moment that I’ll cherish; I was kayaking under Congress Bridge watching the bats fly and Leslie’s tiara-laden head popped up over the railing. We waved to each other and he flashed me the biggest smile. Peace to you Leslie and thanks for shaking it and shaking things up around here..

  50. Deborah Dopp
    March 8, 2012

    RIP Leslie Cochran. This is for all who love

    Related by soul, depths we fathom with our hearts,
    In love with loving and giving,
    Paradise is what you gave.

  51. kryptochick01
    March 8, 2012

    I remember first seeing Leslie outside of Albertson’s at Braker Ln. and I35 in the summer of 1996 just standing on the corner wearing nothing but high heels and a thong bikini. It made quite an impression for sure!

    Although I knew “of” him I never did meet him until June of 1999 the night of my bachelorette party. The girls and I were walking down sixth street when suddenly he spotted me dressed in my veil, tiara and sash across me that said “Bride To Be” and hopped down from the van he was sitting on top of, went across the street, purchased a single red rose and gave it to me. Then he told me I was beautiful and that my fiance was a lucky man. It was the most incredibly sweet gesture! Up until then I had no idea what a kind and special man he was. I will l never forget that night and I will never forget Leslie.

    I pray he is at peace now and if I could tell him something I would tell him we will do our best to “Keep Austin Weird” just for you…

  52. Shanna
    March 8, 2012

    I have two favorite Leslie stories…
    Firstly, the night I took out a new friend who’d just moved here from Chicago. He wanted to play pool and I wasn’t in the mood. So who walks into Casino? None other than Leslie, who was more that happy to play him a few games, and flash his thong for good measure. That’s a good Austin welcome.

    Another time, years ago, I was working for the Statesman. A coworker and I went out for the night, and she lost her badge. A day or so later, she had a couple of messages on her machine that of all people, Leslie had found it, and had gone to the trouble of tracking her down to return it. She invited him to a charity thing the Statesman was having and he showed up, in a dress, heels, and a skirt. The publisher was livid (Leslie was also running for mayor at the time–so political!), but Leslie was a doll, even donating to one of the charity causes at the event, pulling some cash out of his stylish purse.

    R.I.P. Leslie. Austin won’t be the same without you.

  53. Melissa
    March 8, 2012

    Leslie- I had to explain why a man was in a dress to my young children one day. They smiled and you smiled back. I told them- Kids, it’s because Leslie is expressing himself and is happy to share with everyone his happiness. It seemed such a simple thing to say, but truly- it did a lot for my kids back them. They were very young. Now my teenagers know you by first name and you still bring a smile to their face. Thank you for giving us your happiness and for always being what you wanted to be, regardless of what anyone thought of you. Keeping you in our hearts, in Austin TX today and always!!!

  54. michael jew
    March 8, 2012

    I was working at a local bike shop in 1996 when Leslie made his way into Austin. He was on a heavy trike, pulling a large trailer with all his belongings. We spoke at length about his journey to Texas. I told him that he would love Austin but I warned him also that Austin was pretty weird.

    R.I.P. Leslie. Austin thanks you
    for keeping it weird.

  55. Barb
    March 8, 2012

    One time, on a freezing November night several years back, I saw Leslie standing outside of a bar on sixth street. He was wearing one of those spunky little cheerleader skirts. I said to him “Hey! It’s way too cold to be wearing that outfit!” and, cheeky as always, he pulled up his skirt, slapped his ass, and said “I’m too hot NOT to!” ;)

    You have to respect that kind of attitude! RIP Leslie, you will be missed.

  56. just wow
    March 8, 2012

    My first up close encounter with Leslie was at the Statesman. There was a function in the courtyard and as I looked up Leslie rounded the corner. I was speechless as he sauntered though the gathering grown.I quickly came to the conclusion that men should never wear double knit skirts. There was just a little too much jiggle in his wiggle.

  57. Mary Ann Castro
    March 8, 2012

    I’ve lived in Austin for 23 yrs now, so I can’t recall the first time I saw him. Other than seeing him on 6th Street, I’ve seen him at many places like Eeyores, during Santacon where I have a picture with him, at Texas Chili Parlour and Casino El Camino bar. He walked with us for a bit when we left Doc’s bar once. I will miss him. Sad day for Austin!

  58. Eric
    March 8, 2012

    Leslie was rad, I lived across the street from him for awhile a few years ago and most recently he would show up outside of my work to smoke spirits with me. I’ll never forget the day when he offered me 100$ in food stamps when he found out I had fallen upon hard times. I could not bring myself to take them. Some folks in Austin that work at bouguise restaurants regularly shit talked Leslie & complained about Leslie walking out on tabs. I always make sure to set them straight when they say those things because Leslie was one of the most kind and generous characters that Austin has had the pleasure of having around.

  59. another Eric
    March 8, 2012

    I first met Leslie at Wheatsville, soon after he arrived in Austin. He parked his giant bike trailer out front and came in to do a bit of shopping, wearing his customary warm-weather outfit of thong, micro-miniskirt, and sports bra (all basic black that day). Being new in town, he had caused a bit of a stir in the store, and I was pleased that he brought his purchases to my register so I could get a better look at this soon-to-be icon of Austin. After I told him the total, he made a big production of looking for his money. Eventually a look of “eureka!” came over his face (and a twinkle to his eye), and he triumphantly pulled a small bundle of bills out of his bra — my first taste of Leslie’s mischievous wit.

  60. Mke
    March 8, 2012

    enjoyed a cigarette and conversation with Leslie at Casino El Camino when I first moved to Austin 12 years ago. One of the first people I ever met. It’s one of my fondest memories.

  61. K Morton
    March 8, 2012

    I remember vividly going to a Lance Armstrong parade after he won one of his Tour de France titles. I was standing there on Congress Ave. and suddenly the crowd went wild. I thought for sure it had to be Lance, but no it was Leslie who had jumped on the back of a convertible and was wearing a U.T. cheerleader outfit and shaking pom-poms. Lance got polite applause, but not even close to Leslie’s. I live in Seattle now, but Leslie was the epitome of Keep Austin Weird. He will be missed.

  62. Rebecca Morgan-Wetzel
    March 8, 2012

    Man, I was just looking up for a friend of mine at work who is going to SXSW to keep an eye out for Leslie. As I have moved to Burlington, Vermont now.
    He was a fixture of Austin and will be missed. I told him one night, “Leslie your more of man then I am a woman to walk around in pumps and Wow!! look at your legs.” We had coffee together one morning the most interesting person to talk with. I know we can say, rest in peace, but your memories will forever live on in each of us that you’ve touched.!

  63. Brad Houghtby
    March 8, 2012

    When i moved to Texas in 96, Leslie was the first person I ever met/talked to. He was outside Albertsons on Lamar and Braker lane protesting. Since then numerous more encounters followed and while he never could get my name right (either called me Brian, Bret, or Billy) he still recognized a face. Gonna miss that dude.

  64. Lauren Rodriguez
    March 8, 2012

    I met Leslie in 2007… I was new to the area and had driven to Austin to meet up with some girlfriends from grad school. After we parted ways I got lost in downtonwn trying to find my vehicle… I was really frustrated when he approached me and the following conversation ensued:

    “You ok, honey?”, he asked.
    “Not really… I don’t know where I am.”
    He smiled sympathetically, looked at me like I was crazy, and said, “Sweetheart, you are in Austin…”

  65. Mary Hutka
    March 8, 2012

    I first saw Leslie at the Albertson’s at Braker and Lamar. We didn’t know his name then, so we called him Hippy Dippy (like the Hippy Dippy Weatherman by George Carlin). Albertson’s turned the sprinklers on Leslie and he moved downtown. Everyone in Austin knew Leslie by then. I saw him at Eeyore’s Birthday party a few years ago. A college girl was shrieking in excitement on her cell phone -”Mom, I just rode the shuttle bus with Leslie!” He wore stilettos and carried a portable toilet. I complimented him on his high heels, and he returned the compliment. “Bitchin’ outfit you’re wearing!” Oh, Leslie, there will never be another one like you.

  66. I’m from Louisiana, and New Orleans is weird but Austin is a different kind of weird and Lesslie Was/is a big part of that. I remember when i first stepped off the bus and Headed downtown I stepped off the bus downtown and saw leslie for the first time and was like WTF was that? He had on this little fishnet thing full beard and a G string, I have never saw anything like that before and I was so shocked that know one else was shocked and though it was weird. I asked my self what in the world is going on here in Austin?

    As time past I got use to Austin and the vibe of the city, I just love how Austin is so laided back and allows everyone to be who they are. No matter how weird you think you are you can and will fit right in here in Austin. Later on I ran across Lesslie again many times while here in Austin, even more when I found my self Homeless. After running into Leslie on almost a daily bases I got to really know him and he is a great guy. He made Austin what it is today and he will truly be missed.

    I do silk screening and I have around 20 shirts that I will print in membranes of Leslie free of charge to whoever wants one. I would love to give more but I just can’t afford it at this time. If anyone has his sisters contact info tell her to Email me cause I want to save one for her so I need her size. She can Email me at D3L0C4T3D@gmail.com tell her I was the big black guy at the march wearing the tiara

  67. Lisa Martin
    March 9, 2012

    This is my Leslie story. Jesse, my son, was five years old and was selling Camp Fire candy in front of Book People. Leslie came by with his cage and all his belongings and asked the price of the candy. He then went off and panhandled enough money to come back and buy a box of candy. When he left, Jesse said, “Mama, that was so sad. That man was so poor he had to wear ladies clothes.” A short time later Ann Richards came by and gave Jesse a $100 donation. What a day!

  68. Donald
    March 9, 2012

    When I had my office in that old building on San Jacinto, we used to drink and toke together occasionally, and he told me his story. He was just a man trying to point out how absurd our culture has become. The crossdressing was just a stunt, born of his kind heart and the frustration of the underclass. He wanted to make sure that we all understand what a great and special place we live in, Austin and Earth. We are richer for your life, and poorer for your passing. ♥

  69. Torey
    March 10, 2012

    Leslie gave me four cigarettes at a bus stop once. The next time I saw him it was drinks on me. He was such good conversation, even if my boyfriend thought he was crass. You will be missed, Leslie…

  70. Fargo Dave
    March 10, 2012

    The news brings a tear to my eye.

    Sadly we moved away from Austin a few years ago. But LC was one of my favorite memories that I will always carry forth. He was a ‘life teacher’ for me – and I try to explain his spirit to students of mine. I always waved and said a friendly “Hello Leslie!”, he always waved back or showed a little ‘cheek’ with a smile.

    He was closer with a classmate of mine and she would always say how kind LC was. When she moved into her apartment he walked up on the sidewalk and offered to help (nobody else did), at first she was ‘taken aback’ by his ‘weird’ appearance but accepted the offer. He helped her carry her few possessions upstairs and talked about things – only to return later with a welcome token. LC understood Karma – he lived it.

    What if we could all be just a little like LC? Would the world be nicer?
    ‘Imagine’….

  71. Kathryn Jennings
    March 11, 2012

    I had the privilege of having Leslie spend the night on my couch one night. I was particularly struck by the fact that he brought “guest gifts” for my roommate and I. Two decorative items he had foraged from a dumpster. The gifts weren’t what mattered, it was the intent. A man with so little graciously giving what he could. I think that was what Leslie was all about – giving. In the face of persecution he never lost sight of his ideals of respect, courteousness, and genuine caring. I’ll miss you Leslie. Thanks for making my life a little more interesting and renewing my hope in the goodness of man.

  72. Karen
    March 21, 2012

    Only a few short weeks ago people that had supported Leslie generously and without judgment unfortunately were becoming frustrated at the worsening situation. It’s just ironic how things happen for a reason. Leslie will never be homeless again. 🌈

  73. BrandiBoyd
    April 2, 2012

    My first encounter with Leslie was not long after moving to Austin in 2000 (maybe?), at a Pecan Street Festival, with my 7 year old daughter. We were walking around, enjoying the scene, and so was Leslie. Out of the blue, my daughter asked “Mama, why is that man wearing a tutu?” I turned to see a thong-clad, high heeled Leslie with his parasol, trying to wave down a group of frat-boy types. “Because he likes to, and he can, here,” I explained. Later that day we went to Katz’s, where Leslie’s anti-APD rant-covered trike was parked in the back lot. Again, my daughter was curious about it. We stopped to read what it said, and that led to a long discussion about homelessness and ‘wanderers’, and how society treats them. Having just moved from a very small conservative Texas town, I remember being so grateful for the opportunity Leslie gave me to ensure my daughter was exposed to all kinds of people, and had the chance to form her own opinions about them.

    Over the years, we had our “Leslie moments”…as we all did. They always left me …again…grateful to live someplace where people like Leslie were allowed to be who they really were, and were celebrated for it.

    Eventually, I ended up becoming brief proprietor of a long-loved Austin “weird” iconic store, Flashback, after it’s move to South First Street…right in Leslie’s home stomping grounds. I’d see him meandering through the parking lot and hanging out with neighbors behind the shop.

    One hot summer day he came in, ass cheeks and all, to see if anyone had tried to come sell some purses to me that day. Apparently someone had stolen several of his, and some other belongings. I listened carefully, let him look at the handbags I had, and introduced myself as a long time admirer. At the same time, my landlord and some related people were in the store…and thier demeanor towards Leslie was less than courteous. Far less. It really disturbed me…I treated everyone who came into the store as a valued customer and human being, whether they were in a thong or a fabulous fifties dress, sober or three sheets to the wind. And my previous experiences with Leslie had a lot to do with that.

    So, as my time with the shop progressed, and the work load and economy began to take it’s toll, I ended up spending more and more time at the shop than at home. I’d start my morning on the porch with coffee before setting up for the day, and end it with a beer on the porch after sundown, doing homework and paperwork with my daughter. Slowly, Leslie began to come around more and more often, gingerly sitting on the porch steps and asking how the day was, commenting on the mannequin’s outfits, and offering his help with closing up/cleaning up duties. It was always appreciated.

    Over time, Leslie became my morning coffee buddy, bringing his crosswords, and watching the front of the shop as I opened up. He never asked for a thing in return. But I always had something in the shop that only Leslie could pull off, and it was a joy to meet him with something sequined in hand and watch him strip down right there, wherever we were, to try it on with glee.

    For a time, he kept a storage unit nearby with many of his belongings. One day, he came by to tell me he had to move out of it and was cleaning it out, and would I please come by, because he had some things for me. I did…and Leslie loaded up the back of my SUV with accumulated purses, jewelry, suitcases, and chachkis for the store and for my daughter and I, while we helped him tidy what was left. I was impressed with his organization and ingenuity. We shared a couple of beers there, in the dirt parking lot, and he confided that out of many people he had asked for help, I had been the only one to actually come through, and squeezed my hand and said “you’re a true friend, girl”. It was one of the most meaningful admissions of the sort I’ve ever received.

    After that, Leslie was, without fail, at the store at opening and closing, every day to help me set up outside displays and carry heavy items. Occasionally his dumpster diving would net something perfect for the store, and he would refuse payment of any kind for it. In return, for a short time, Flashback became a place he could consider a secondary home. It surely turned a few people off, but for the most part, customers and friends were happy to see him around. He always knew how to liven up a dead group of customers – even uninitiated, slightly afraid tourists…and he also always knew when his presence was unhelpful.

    Almost always. I can recall one spring afternoon having a friend come in and ask “Do you know Leslie is outside shaving his legs on the porch?”. I went out to see for myself, and sure enough, there he was, spread eagle amidst the porch mannequins, electric razor plugged into the outside outlet, shaving cream, cup and hand razor at his side, sudsing up and delicately shaving his shapely legs. I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry…but I stiffled a laugh as I asked him to wait till after hours, and had to explain to him just why that might be a turnoff to potential customers so would he please hold off….which of course he did, with appologies, once I’d explained it a few times.

    That summer, Leslie had asked a business next door to host his birthday party, reserving paid time just like any other customer. He was SO excited, and for weeks before told everyone he saw to attend his “first annual” birthday bash. Less than a week before the big day, the business told him they could not host his party. There is more I could say about this but…I’ll be gracious. Simply, they couldn’t accept his reservation any longer. Leslie was crushed. And worried…he’d been telling hundreds of people to show up there the following day. I didn’t hesitate to offer up the porch, where we could catch incoming party goers and redirect them. It ended up being a very intimate gathering, but one of the best parties I’ve ever attended.

    The following month was my own birthday, and being a busy and scattered small business owner, I had only had time and forethought to invite a few close friends to dinner after closing time. That day I sat outside after work, waiting for my friends, who never came. Leslie, though, appeared out of no-where, with a handful of wrapped gifts and a six pack of my favorite beer. His thoughtfulness made me cry. And his gifts were perfect (and mostly unmentionable).

    It was only a few months after that when Leslie had his first head injury. And a few months after that, that Flashback transfered out of my hands. While we kept up with each other through texts and occasionaly running into one another, my daily dose of off color was gone, and it left a real deficit in my life. As Leslie’s health declined and his public appearances became fewer, so many things in Austin were really changing. It felt almost that as he was slipping away, so were the many things I had come to love Austin for.

    I last saw Leslie in La Mexicana in November 2011, as I was preparing to move to New Orleans. He looked tired, and haggard, and still fabulous in his tiny denim skirt. But his eyes lit up like old times and we hugged and shared a margarita, and for a moment the old Leslie was back. I told him I was going and he looked thoughtful for a moment. “New Orleans, huh? Maybe next Mardi Gras…” he trailed off, and I jumped in to tell him he’d always be welcome. He wished me luck, and I the same. His last hospitalization fell right before Fat Tuesday. All throughout the parades I kept thinking “If only Leslie could be here!” – because other than Austin, I can’t think of a more perfect place for him to be. Instead, I put on the rings he had given me, and carried a purple suede purse he’d insisted I keep, and carried Leslie through Mardi Gras in spirit.

    Then I heard the rumor that he was leaving for Colorado. Something didn’t seem right about that, it left me uneasy. I reached out to some close friends who have rallied around Leslie since his 2009 injury, who filled me in on his condition in the hospital, and then later in hospice, and relayed my messages to him. On the day he passed, I woke up at 4:30am with a start. I thought a building noise had woken me, and went back to sleep. When my alarm went off two hours later, I had a text from our mutual friend sent at a few minutes to 5am, saying he was now in paradise. It felt to me as if the last unicorn had died.

    Since then, it’s funny. All the little things Leslie gave me, which had been packed and moved with my other belongings, seem to keep popping up. I found his ring in a coat pocket. A pipe he gave me ended up being the only one to survive the move. My current purse strap broke, and I could find no other handbags except for one Leslie gave me. His magnet set has always been on my fridge but only now have my new local friends begun to notice and comment on it. All the crazy clothes he game me that were too much to wear in Austin work perfectly for French Quarter parades and second lines. I miss his friendship, but it feels like a little bit of Leslie is here in NOLA with me.

  74. BrandiBoyd
    April 2, 2012

    My first encounter with Leslie was not long after moving to Austin in 2000 (maybe?), at a Pecan Street Festival, with my 7 year old daughter. We were walking around, enjoying the scene, and so was Leslie. Out of the blue, my daughter asked “Mama, why is that man wearing a tutu?” I turned to see a thong-clad, high heeled Leslie with his parasol, trying to wave down a group of frat-boy types. “Because he likes to, and he can, here,” I explained. Later that day we went to Katz’s, where Leslie’s anti-APD rant-covered trike was parked in the back lot. Again, my daughter was curious about it. We stopped to read what it said, and that led to a long discussion about homelessness and ‘wanderers’, and how society treats them. Having just moved from a very small conservative Texas town, I remember being so grateful for the opportunity Leslie gave me to ensure my daughter was exposed to all kinds of people, and had the chance to form her own opinions about them.

    Over the years, we had our “Leslie moments”…as we all did. They always left me …again…grateful to live someplace where people like Leslie were allowed to be who they really were, and were celebrated for it.

    Eventually, I ended up becoming brief proprietor of a long-loved Austin “weird” iconic store, Flashback, after it’s move to South First Street…right in Leslie’s home stomping grounds. I’d see him meandering through the parking lot and hanging out with neighbors behind the shop.

    One hot summer day he came in, ass cheeks and all, to see if anyone had tried to come sell some purses to me that day. Apparently someone had stolen several of his, and some other belongings. I listened carefully, let him look at the handbags I had, and introduced myself as a long time admirer. At the same time, my landlord and some related people were in the store…and thier demeanor towards Leslie was less than courteous. Far less. It really disturbed me…I treated everyone who came into the store as a valued customer and human being, whether they were in a thong or a fabulous fifties dress, sober or three sheets to the wind. And my previous experiences with Leslie had a lot to do with that.

    So, as my time with the shop progressed, and the work load and economy began to take it’s toll, I ended up spending more and more time at the shop than at home. I’d start my morning on the porch with coffee before setting up for the day, and end it with a beer on the porch after sundown, doing homework and paperwork with my daughter. Slowly, Leslie began to come around more and more often, gingerly sitting on the porch steps and asking how the day was, commenting on the mannequin’s outfits, and offering his help with closing up/cleaning up duties. It was always appreciated.

    Over time, Leslie became my morning coffee buddy, bringing his crosswords, and watching the front of the shop as I opened up. He never asked for a thing in return. But I always had something in the shop that only Leslie could pull off, and it was a joy to meet him with something sequined in hand and watch him strip down right there, wherever we were, to try it on with glee.

    For a time, he kept a storage unit nearby with many of his belongings. One day, he came by to tell me he had to move out of it and was cleaning it out, and would I please come by, because he had some things for me. I did…and Leslie loaded up the back of my SUV with accumulated purses, jewelry, suitcases, and chachkis for the store and for my daughter and I, while we helped him tidy what was left. I was impressed with his organization and ingenuity. We shared a couple of beers there, in the dirt parking lot, and he confided that out of many people he had asked for help, I had been the only one to actually come through, and squeezed my hand and said “you’re a true friend, girl”. It was one of the most meaningful admissions of the sort I’ve ever received.

    After that, Leslie was, without fail, at the store at opening and closing, every day to help me set up outside displays and carry heavy items. Occasionally his dumpster diving would net something perfect for the store, and he would refuse payment of any kind for it. In return, for a short time, Flashback became a place he could consider a secondary home. It surely turned a few people off, but for the most part, customers and friends were happy to see him around. He always knew how to liven up a dead group of customers – even uninitiated, slightly afraid tourists…and he also always knew when his presence was unhelpful.

    Almost always. I can recall one spring afternoon having a friend come in and ask “Do you know Leslie is outside shaving his legs on the porch?”. I went out to see for myself, and sure enough, there he was, spread eagle amidst the porch mannequins, electric razor plugged into the outside outlet, shaving cream, cup and hand razor at his side, sudsing up and delicately shaving his shapely legs. I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry…but I stiffled a laugh as I asked him to wait till after hours, and had to explain to him just why that might be a turnoff to potential customers so would he please hold off….which of course he did, with appologies, once I’d explained it a few times.

    That summer, Leslie had asked a business next door to host his birthday party, reserving paid time just like any other customer. He was SO excited, and for weeks before told everyone he saw to attend his “first annual” birthday bash. Less than a week before the big day, the business told him they could not host his party. There is more I could say about this but…I’ll be gracious. Simply, they couldn’t accept his reservation any longer. Leslie was crushed. And worried…he’d been telling hundreds of people to show up there the following day. I didn’t hesitate to offer up the porch, where we could catch incoming party goers and redirect them. It ended up being a very intimate gathering, but one of the best parties I’ve ever attended.

    The following month was my own birthday, and being a busy and scattered small business owner, I had only had time and forethought to invite a few close friends to dinner after closing time. That day I sat outside after work, waiting for my friends, who never came. Leslie, though, appeared out of no-where, with a handful of wrapped gifts and a six pack of my favorite beer. His thoughtfulness made me cry. And his gifts were perfect (and mostly unmentionable).

    It was only a few months after that when Leslie had his first head injury. And a few months after that, that Flashback transfered out of my hands. While we kept up with each other through texts and occasionaly running into one another, my daily dose of off color was gone, and it left a real deficit in my life. As Leslie’s health declined and his public appearances became fewer, so many things in Austin were really changing. It felt almost that as he was slipping away, so were the many things I had come to love Austin for.

    I last saw Leslie in La Mexicana in November 2011, as I was preparing to move to New Orleans. He looked tired, and haggard, and still fabulous in his tiny denim skirt. But his eyes lit up like old times and we hugged and shared a margarita, and for a moment the old Leslie was back. I told him I was going and he looked thoughtful for a moment. “New Orleans, huh? Maybe next Mardi Gras…” he trailed off, and I jumped in to tell him he’d always be welcome. He wished me luck, and I the same. His last hospitalization fell right before Fat Tuesday. All throughout the parades I kept thinking “If only Leslie could be here!” – because other than Austin, I can’t think of a more perfect place for him to be. Instead, I put on the rings he had given me, and carried a purple suede purse he’d insisted I keep, and carried Leslie through Mardi Gras in spirit.

    Then I heard the rumor that he was leaving for Colorado. Something didn’t seem right about that, it left me uneasy. I reached out to some close friends who have rallied around Leslie since his 2009 injury, who filled me in on his condition in the hospital, and then later in hospice, and relayed my messages to him. On the day he passed, I woke up at 4:30am with a start. I thought a building noise had woken me, and went back to sleep. When my alarm went off two hours later, I had a text from our mutual friend sent at a few minutes to 5am, saying he was now in paradise. It felt to me as if the last unicorn had died.

    Since then, it’s funny. All the little things Leslie gave me, which had been packed and moved with my other belongings, seem to keep popping up. I found his ring in a coat pocket. A pipe he gave me ended up being the only one to survive the move. My current purse strap broke, and I could find no other handbags except for one Leslie gave me. His magnet set has always been on my fridge but only now have my new local friends begun to notice and comment on it. All the crazy clothes he game me that were too much to wear in Austin work perfectly for French Quarter parades and second lines. I miss his friendship, and his quirky wisdom… but it feels like a little bit of Leslie is here in NOLA with me.

  75. Ken
    June 2, 2012

    Years ago, a graduate school colleague introduced me to the “Leslie theory of cool” which states that where ever you are, if Leslie is there, it is simultaneously the coolist and the hottest place in town.

  76. siir
    July 29, 2012

    hmm. fine ideas. thanks

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